A Boy Made of Blocks by Keith Stuart

512kltzit-lWhat I thought:

I hadn’t heard of this book until the reveal of Richard and Judy’s new Spring book club reads, but it had some great reviews and sounded like it might be a book I would enjoy.

Alex Rowe is newly estranged from his wife Jody and moves in with his childhood friend, Dan. Alex and Jody had been having problems as they have an autistic son, Sam, who has taken every ounce of their attention since he was born eight years ago. I don’t have children and can only imagine how hard it is to raise them, but autism brings its own set of unique issues that must be incredibly difficult to navigate. Alex had been withdrawing as he didn’t seem to know how to get through to Sam and was living his life walking on egg-shells just waiting for the next outburst that he knew he wouldn’t be able to deal with. The author has a son who is autistic and I would imagine that many of the feelings he describes are ones he’s lived with as it certainly felt very authentic; I held my breath along with Alex on many an occasion worrying that Sam would be upset or overwhelmed by something that he wouldn’t know how to fix.

The book focuses on Alex’s realisation that it is him that needs to change in order to understand his son. He starts to read books but it is the video game of Minecraft that finally begins to break down the barriers between them. It wasn’t plain sailing and the road ahead of them still has to be carefully navigated but they finally start to trust each other.

I don’t know about video games either and there was a lot of Minecraft talk in this book which sometimes resulted in me skimming parts. I guess it was appropriate, however, to the plot as it was the vehicle to their bonding. The strengthening of their relationship unfolded slowly but was a joy to watch.

“”Daddy!”

It’s the sweetest sound, piercing four days of blank grey silence. My son, miles away, but suddenly right here under the same boxy clouds.”

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“I struggle to my feet, taking his hand and walking on, thinking it is all over, this little window of intimacy.

But when we stop at a road, he slips his hand out of mine for a second, then softly pats me on the back.

“My Daddy,” he says.

And the moment is so perfect, I feel the stars will fall upon us.”

Verdict:

I really enjoyed this book. It was simple and sweet and felt genuine. I wasn’t so drawn to some of the other main characters however: Dan never felt fully fleshed out to me and Alex’s sister Emma was a complete enigma (I just couldn’t fathom a strong enough reason she had for not wanting to come home or speak to her mother). The ending, however, was just lovely. Heart-warming and feel-good.

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