Review: Killer Affair by Rebecca Chance

51O6gCvCIZL._SX322_BO1,204,203,200_What I thought:

What an absolute riot this book was! My first Rebecca Chance and I have already ordered her entire back catalogue. Pure fizz and sparkle – I loved it!

Caroline, a bored office worker and book blogger, can’t believe her luck when she is asked to ghostwrite the autobiography of the most famous reality TV star in the UK – Lexy O’Brien. Lexy shot to fame 20 years ago on a TV dating show and is now married to a premier league football player, has two bratty kids, and lives in a mansion. Unable to curb her wild ways and doing anything to keep in the paper, Caroline knows that writing Lexy’s memoirs will be a blast, only she’s not quite prepared for the green-eyed monster that not only rears its head but ultimately plots Lexy’s downfall…

I’ll be honest here, I never expected to pick up a Rebecca Chance book. Not because I’m snobby about what people read (I’m a champion of people reading full stop, without judging their tastes), but just because I can’t stand the world these type of people live in. I don’t watch much reality TV (TOWIE, Big Brother, Love Island etc.) and I can’t stand those magazines, the likes of which body shame on the front cover and are choc full of scantily-clad, fame-hungry wannabes inside. So what the hell happened?

Less than a month ago, I read my first Tasmina Perry book on a whim, never having read anything quite like that before. Since then I have devoured three more and, drawn by the glitzy cover, decided to pick up Rebecca Chance’s latest too. I must be in the mood for pure escapism because that’s what these books are and I’m having so much fun reading them.

There was never a dull moment in Killer Affair. I entered a world I didn’t know existed and have been simultaneously shocked, thrilled, delighted, enraged and stunned. What particularly tickled me were the references (sometimes only thinly veiled) to people I thought I recognised which got me wondering how close to the truth some of it was (see, there is a gossip in me after all…). It was certainly an eye-opener, put it that way.

Verdict:

A riot of fun, frolicks and f…ing. NEXT!!!

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Have you read any Rebecca Chance books? Which one did you like best and why? Any other authors like this I should be reading?

Throwback Thursday: Water for Elephants by Sara Gruen

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Throwback Thursday is a meme created by Renée at It’s Book Talk to share old favourite books rather than just the new shiny ones. This is a great idea to bring back to life some much-loved books. Please feel free to join in.

This week I have chosen:

 

Image result for water for elephants bookWater for Elephants by Sara Gruen:

This book is a real gem: a rare gem that thrills and shocks simultaneously. This is a beautifully written, well researched, off-beat love story about a young man called Jacob who (having been suddenly orphaned at the age of 22 while at university and in the age of the depression in America) finds himself, quite unexpectedly, working for a circus. Here we are treated to a feast of colourful (many rather unsavoury) characters (with dwarves, bearded ladies and a whole host of animals).  This book is just spectacular – the way that I was immersed into circus life was astounding, I really felt the atmosphere, the sounds, the smells; I was there in the big top, there on the train in the dead of night, there at the raucous after-show parties – Gruen did a fantastic job of setting the scene.

Animals are one of my biggest passions (along with books and travel) and therefore any book containing animals is usually a hit with me. Water for Elephants is not only a love story between Jacob and Marlena (a married woman whom he loves from afar) but also between Jacob and his animals, imparticular an elephant named Rosie whom I also fell in love with.
The story flits between Jacob as an old man in a nursing home (where a circus comes to town which brings back all his memories) and Jacob in the 1930’s during his circus years. This is a wonderfully written, engrossing, captivating novel and I felt lost when I had finished it; I truly had withdrawal symptoms. After now having seen the film, I want to immerse myself in this wonderfully vibrant and chaotic world that is The Benzini Brothers Most Spectacular Show on Earth. If you think you won’t like a book set in a circus, think again; there’s so much more to it and I promise you won’t be disappointed.

Verdict:

An absolute joy! A book that made me laugh, cry, and everything in between. I cannot recommend highly enough.

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Review: The Pool House by Tasmina Perry

Image result for the pool house tasmina perryWhat I thought:

I have long been aware of the name Tasmina Perry as an author but never been tempted to even venture as far as the first page in any of her books, simply deciding that they weren’t for me. What then drove me to select this on a whim? I have no idea but I am SO glad I did – I loved it!

Mysteries are my favourite genre so when The Pool House started with a murder I was hooked anyway but add a luxurious Hamptons Beach House and I was instantly transported to the glamorous world of young, rich socialites who will do anything to rise to the top. Being everything that I normally despise about society, these self-serving, ruthless individuals, when blended together with sunshine and New York night life, make a heady cocktail of shenanigans that fizz off the pages.

Jem and her husband Dan have moved to NYC from London to live the dream and Dan to pursue his career in publishing. When they are invited to house-share a beach house in the Hamptons with three other couples every weekend in the summer, they jump at the chance. Not quite able to believe their luck, they settle into their new lifestyle quickly and all is well until Jem discovers that the couple who had the room last year didn’t have quite so much luck when Alice was found dead in the swimming pool. With the group reluctant to discuss what happened last summer, Jem – with the help of neighbour and famous thriller writer, Michael Kearney – sets out to uncover what really happened that night, but it seems she may be meddling where she’s not wanted…

Verdict:

This book was so good! I was so engrossed in the story that I could have actually been there and what’s more, I’ve discovered that a lifestyle that would actually be my idea of hell is actually damn good fun to read about. I loved it so much that I’ve gone on to download three more of Perry’s books.

Fun, pacy and with oodles of glamour and also incredibly well written, I am now a firm fan. Highly recommended!

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NB/ I requested a copy of this book on Amazon Vine in return for an honest review. The Pool House by Tasmina Perry is published in the UK in September 2017 by Headline. 

Throwback Thursday: Innocent Traitor by Alison Weir

throwbackthursday

Throwback Thursday is a meme created by Renée at It’s Book Talk to share old favourite books rather than just the new shiny ones. This is a great idea to bring back to life some much-loved books. Please feel free to join in.

This week I have chosen one of my favourite historical fiction books:

downloadInnocent Traitor by Alison Weir

Wow! I loved this! It was like watching a series of Shameless but with posh people. Greed, bad mothers, bad fathers, plotting, bitching, murdering, affairs, rape……phew! Really, you couldn’t make this stuff up!

Seriously though, this is such a well-written account of Lady Jane Grey, the young 16-year-old Queen of England who only ruled for 9 days. It starts at her birth (to a mother who would have been carted off by social services today) and follows her throughout her 16 years by her own account and by accounts of those closest to her. Poor girl! She really was just a pawn in her parents’ greedy plans and ultimately met her death because of it. Lady Jane Grey was a complete surprise to me too: she was willful, feisty, somewhat precocious and very pious. For a girl to speak her mind so much in those days must have been incredibly difficult but speak it she does. The other big surprise for me was Queen Mary who was kind and compassionate in a way that I never knew. I thoroughly enjoyed this book – my first Weir.

Verdict:

Never a dull moment, it rips along making you unwilling to put it down. An amazing period in history has been brought vibrantly to life. Stunningly good read!

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Review: Then She Was Gone by Lisa Jewell

51E9pZF3USLWhat I thought:

Having read, and loved, I Found You, not too long ago, I was ecstatic to see that Lisa Jewell had another book out and dived straight in. Another good’n!

Fifteen-year-old Ellie Mack disappears one day on the way to the library. Ellie is pretty, popular, clever, has a boyfriend and is just about to sit her GCSE’s – she has everything going for her and everything to live for, and that’s how her mother Laurel knows she hasn’t just run away. The story hops between the time that Ellie went missing and 10 years later when Laurel is only just starting to pick up the pieces of her life (now divorced from Ellie’s father and emotionally detached from her two remaining children). When she meets a charismatic stranger, Floyd, Laurel dares to hope for some sort of future – until she meets Floyd’s 9-year-old daughter, Poppy, who bears a striking resemblance to Ellie.

While harrowing in places, it’s never gratuitous and Jewell gets it spot on in terms of pace – speeding up when mystery and intrigue are at play and slowing it down in order for the reader to fully understand the impact Ellie’s disappearance has had on everyone.

Verdict:

Gripping and heartfelt, Then She Was Gone has plot and characters with depth which is something of a rarity in this genre. Big thumbs up!

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Review: Did You See Melody? by Sophie Hannah

51T2Wtx1HsLWhat I thought:

I was lured in to reading this book after having read Sophie Hannah’s very early books and loving them (and then later on, not so much). This one sounded intriguing though: Cara Burrows, on holiday from England, walks into the wrong hotel room and sees the most famous murder victim in the USA, Melody Chapa, whose parents are serving life sentences for her murder. Or does she?

Well, where to begin? I scratched my head for most of this book, wondering if it was meant to be tongue-in-cheek or even a spoof of this very crowded genre. Having since seen other reviews, it appears I’m not alone. My reading of this book was accompanied by much eye-rolling, some jaw-dropping and a spot of guffawing at its incredulity.

Cara Burrows goes half way round the world, leaving her family with no way of contacting her and spending all the family savings, to an over-the-top, luxurious American spa for a reason, that as it becomes apparent, just seems ridiculously dramatic. There is much made of Cara giving her phone to a complete stranger of a cab driver so that her family can’t contact her, and less than 24 hours later she is setting up an Instagram account and posting shots of herself to tag in her children to show she’s “OK”. This is an example of the many times I had to suspend my disbelief at a plot which felt so contrived and clunky. Cara herself is not a character I cared about or could even empathise with, and the Americans were, in the main, such caricatures I was almost embarrassed for the author.

Verdict:

This could have been a good story – the premise certainly piqued my interest but I couldn’t see past the gaping plot holes and Hannah’s attempt to stitch them together with something – anything – however tenuous, to get us to the next part of the book. I am more bewildered than disappointed if I’m honest. If this does turn out to be a spoof, then it’s a good one, if not then I can’t recommend I’m afraid.

Review: Friend Request by Laura Marshall

51j-9wc-v1LWhat I thought:

I was intrigued by the blurb on this book: Louise receives a Facebook friend request from Maria Weston. But Maria Weston has been dead for 25 years. Hasn’t she? Back in the early noughties, before Facebook and at the dawn of social media, there was such a thing as Friends Reunited. I remember being so excited that I could now see where my old (pre-mobile, pre-email) school friends had ended up and actually get in touch with them! Until I saw one name….. the name of someone who it was widely believed had died just after we left school. It sent chills down me. First disbelief and then anger that someone was playing a nasty joke until someone got in touch and it came out that she wasn’t dead at all, as we had all believed for the last 10 or so years. The point I’m trying to get to was that when you see the name of someone whom you think is dead, it’s a bloody shock!

Anyhoo, on to the book. I absolutely loved it. Split between present day and a school-leavers party in 1989, Louise is now in her early 40’s, newly divorced with a four-year-old son. Her ex-husband, Sam, is the only person still in her life from her school days as she has deliberately distanced herself from almost everyone and everything to do with that time. We are given enough information to know that whatever happened to Maria Weston at that party, Louise feels responsible for it. More messages, a sense of being watched and an invitation to a school reunion successful ratches up the tension and keeps the plot pacey and gripping.

Verdict:

I loved this book. In a genre that I can become rapidly bored with these days, this one stands out amongst the best I have read in some time. It’s relatable, sometimes uncomfortable and keeps you guessing throughout. Massive thumbs up from me.

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Have you read this yet? I’d love to know your thoughts.